Several on-site courses are conducted at the Pinelands Field Station. These courses are designed to immerse students in the practicalities of conducting ecological research and to introduce students to the pine barrens as a model ecosystem.

In addition, many courses offered at New Brunswick, Camden and Newark campuses of Rutgers University have field components that take advantage of the Pine Barrens. Often students in these courses pass through the field station to use its facilities or to learn about research there.

For a complete listing of Rutgers class schedules, please click here.

 

Current On-Site Summer Session Courses

Field Ecology: (56:120:514 and 50:130: 430)
This 3 credit course is designed to immerse students in the practicalities of conducting ecological research. The course introduces the basis of a number of sampling methodologies in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and some of the basic statistics needed to design and interpret data from field surveys and collections. The course is hands-on and in the field. The course is offered through the Camden summer school and is open to both graduate (56:120:514) and undergraduate (50:130: 430) students.

Camden Undergraduate Courses

Ecology of Soil Organisms (50:120:422)
undergraduate course lectures and lab (3 credits) offered each Spring semester.
This course introduces students to ecological concepts by concentrating on the organisms and processes occurring belowground. Soil is a medium that supports all primary production in terrestrial ecosystems and is vital to our agriculture, forestry and recreational landscapes. The laboratory classes teach students some basic methods of measuring soil processes and introduces them to the diverse groups of soil organisms and their interactions.

Medical, Industrial and Environmental Mycology (50:120:460 and 56:20:592)
a course for Undergraduate (50-120-460) and Graduate (56-120-592) students (3 credits).
A lecture and discussion based course offered every third year in the Fall Semester. The course introduces students to the diversity of activities of fungi that can be of benefit and detriment to humans and our agriculture. The course discusses medical implications of fungi, the way in which fungi can be used in pharmaceutical and nutraceutical industries, their role as a source of food and entertainment, other diverse industrial uses including ‘green chemistry’ and their interactions with human activities in the environment, especially pollutants. Come and learn what we do know about the very small fraction of possible some 5 million potential species of fungi in the world.

Camden Graduate Courses

Medical, Industrial and Environmental Mycology
see above – offered every third Fall Semester.

Advanced Soil Ecology (56:120:595)
A 3 credit graduate lecture course designed to extend the student’s knowledge of the organisms and processes in soil that underpin our agriculture, forestry and natural landscapes throughout the world. Lecture material will be supplemented with focused readings of primary literature. Offered every third Fall Semester

Fungi in Ecosystem Processes (56:120:580)
A 3 credit graduate lecture course discussing the varied ways in which fungi interact with other organisms to effect ecosystem processes of soil development, underpinning primary production, regulation of plant and animal populations and communities, mediating nutrient and carbon cycling and interacting with human activities, especially pollution. Offered every third Fall Semester

Global Change (56:120:535)
A 3 credit graduate which explore the causes and effects of global change with a focus on ecological aspects.  The class focuses on readings of scientific literature and popular media, with in depth discussions of current topics. Offered every other Fall Semester.

New Brunswick Undergraduate Courses

Soil Organism Diversity (11:216:422)
This course introduces students to ecological concepts by concentrating on the organisms and processes occurring belowground. Soil is a medium that supports all primary production in terrestrial ecosystems and is vital to our agriculture, forestry and recreational landscapes. The laboratory classes teach students some basic methods of measuring soil processes and introduces them to the diverse groups of soil organisms and their interactions.

Fungi in Ecosystems (11:015:423)
A 3 credit undergraduate course offered at Cook College and cross listed with a course led by Dr. Jim White (3 credits). This team taught course is a general mycology course introducing students to the diversity of fungi, their physiology and ecology and interactions with humans. John Dighton’s section fulfills the colloquium requirement. Course is offered every Fall Semester.

New Brunswick Graduate Courses

Advanced Mycology (16-765-533)
A team taught graduate Cook College course led by Dr. Peter Oudemans with Jim White and John Dighton (3 credits). The course is lecture and discussion based organized around the taxonomy of fungi and investigates fungal physiology and ecology of each fungal group. Course is offered every third Spring Semester.